Moocing-around a bit more

Well, we’ve finally been released out of lockdown, but I still had a Future Learn course that I had enrolled in that I wanted to finish. It’s called History of Slavery in the British Caribbean, and it was presented by both the University of the West Indies and the University of Glasgow (fitting, because there were many Scottish plantation owners). It was very good. I looked at slavery in the British Caribbean – particularly in British Guiana – for my thesis, and I learned a lot from the course. The course was produced in 2020 so it was brought right up to date with the recent Windrush scandal in the UK, Black Lives Matter and COVID. I hadn’t thought about the significance of language: ‘enslaved’ rather than ‘slave’. Well worth doing

And speaking of slavery, I also watched a webinar produced by the History Council of South Australia called Pre- and Early-Colonial South Australia’s Slavery Connections. There were three speakers: Cameron Coventry, Philip Jones (author of Ochre and Rust, which I must read some day) and librarian Beth Robertson who’ wrote the book’ on Oral History and has been undertaking her own family history. It hadn’t occurred to me that the compensation payments for slave-holders (not the slaves, mind you, only their former owners) hit the pockets of British investors at much the same time as South Australia was established. The speakers concentrated on British MP Raikes Currey, who provided much of the funding behind the South Australian Company from his family slaveholdings; George Fife Angas whose family traded in mahogany from British Honduras and who agitated for the release of indigenous enslaved in Honduras but not enslaved Africans; and Edward Stirling, born on a Jamaican slave plantation to a woman of culture, even though it was not spoken of. It will be online at some stage, I believe.

One of the good things about lockdown is that I have ‘attended’ many more webinars, book launches, discussions etc. than I would have normally. I hope that an online ‘presence’ at such events remains a possibility in the future.

2 responses to “Moocing-around a bit more

  1. Yes I too have been amazed at how the money which flooded into Britain and its colonies from this compensation , changed the world. It fueled the industrial revolution . I have discovered to my horror that my 4 th time GGrandfather was involved in the slave and linen trade in Ireland .He had a a half African son who he seems have acknowledged as his son . This man lived in the household of his legitimate white sister his whole life and outlived all his siblings . This situation is fascinating as it seems that feelings toward their c=victims in this horrible business were ambiguous. I wish I could travel back and meet them all and find out more .

    • What a fascinating story. Yes- it would be so interesting to go back and talk to them to see how they explained the whole situation to themselves, and to watch the relationships between them.

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