Category Archives: Movies 2018

Movie: A Translator (Un Traductor) Cine Latino Film Festival

Set in the ‘Special Period’ when the Cuban economy plummeted after the demise of the Soveiet Union, a taciturn, aloof Professor of Russian Literature is sent to a Cuban hospital to translate for Russian patients and their parents who have travelled to Cuba in the wake of the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The closing credits point out that over 20,000 Russian children were part of this program that continued until 2011. A father himself, the translator becomes increasingly drawn towards the Russian children, to the detriment of his marriage and relationship with his own son. It is filmed in Cuba, so I enjoyed seeing places I’d visited. The language is really hard to understand, although if you look (or rather, listen) to the trailer, the dialogue is very muffled.

Movie: The Accused (2018) -Acusada- Cine Latino Film Festival 2018

An Argentinian film about a young girl, Dolores, who finally, after two and a half years, faces the court after the murder of her best friend. This friend had posted a sex tape of Dolores, leading to a falling-out between the two girls, and when the friend is found stabbed on the couch after a drunken party, Dolores is accused of the murder. Now she faces the court, her parents having mortgaged the house to employ the best lawyer they can.  The young actress reminded me of Demi Moore in Ghost, and she is very good in manipulating your feelings about her. Is she innocent, exhausted, manipulative or a good liar?

It’s subtitled in English, which is just as well because I could barely follow a word.

My rating: 3.5

Movie: Roma (Cine Latino Film Festival 2018)

I saw this as part of the 2018 Latin American film festival. It’s directed by Alfonso Cuarón, who also directed Gravity and Children of Men. It’s filmed in black and white, and it looks at a year in the life of a middle-class family in the Roma suburb of Mexico City. It reminded me a lot of that other black and white film Of Time and the City, (which in that case was about Liverpool), in that the director is almost writing a love letter to the city of his memory. Lots of observations about class, being a woman, betrayal – and in beautifully clear Spanish! (subtitles in English). It’s very good

My rating: 4.5 stars

Movie: Vita and Virginia

This was a very wordy film, as you might expect given that it was set amongst writers and artists in the Bloomsbury circle. Elizabeth Debicki was excellent, playing an ungainly and  mentally fragile Virginia Woolf. There was rather too much of Vita and Virginia staring face-on to the camera in close-up, talking, and felt myself getting rather bored by it all. I wanted to like it more than I did.

I saw this as part of the British Film Festival.

Movie: Jirga

There’s not a lot of dialogue in this film, or at least, not much dialogue that you and I will understand. An Australian ex-soldier, Mike, returns to Afghanistan where he served in the army some years earlier. He had been involved on a raid on a village, and he wants to make amends. He doesn’t speak Pashtun, and to put us as viewers in Mike’s place, nothing is translated.  The landscape is stark- no wonder armies founder there.

It’s an excellent meditation on repentance and forgiveness.

My rating: 4 stars.

And here’s an interesting video about the making of Jirga

Movie: Ferrante Fever

This is showing at the moment in Melbourne as part of the Italian Film Festival. It is a documentary about the Elena Ferrante phenomenon, exploring the universal popularity of her books and contextualizing the Neapolitan novels amongst Ferrante’s other works. It doesn’t necessarily dwell on who the author is, but instead considers the effect of having an invisible and unknown author, both on readers and the book marketing industry.  The documentary features several well-known talking heads, most particularly Elizabeth Strout and Jonathan Franzen for Western readers and translator Ann Goldstein, intercut with animations and small film clips. It has subtitles.

I also saw Nonnas on the Run, one of two ‘Nonna’ films being shown as part of the Italian Film Festival. It’s a bit of a romp with two ladies-of-a-certain-age breaking out of their aged-care hostel. It teeters on the edge of laughter and a stab of sorrow, which is a good thing.

Movie: RBG

With the State Judiciary Committee hearing into Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination, it seemed  particularly apposite to go to see RBG (Ruth Bader Ginsberg) in its last days.  An intelligent lawyer (and strikingly beautiful as a young woman) she worked quietly in the courts, steadily building up cases that showed that everyone loses by discrimination – women in particular.  Nothing came easily to her: the quotas of female students at university (5 male students to every female student), her difficulty in getting a job even though she was an outstanding student because she was a woman – there’s no entitlement here. The documentary does touch on her inappropriate comments about Trump’s nomination, and the question of whether she should have resigned while Obama was still in power. Who knows? Look at the Republican stonewalling over Merrick Garland. But with the prospect of two men on the Supreme Court with sexual assault or harassment allegations, to say nothing of the President, I’m glad she’s there.